hormone replacement therapy

How Hormone Replacement Helps Treat Menopause

hormone replacement therapy training

How Natural Estrogen Replacement Therapy Treats Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis can now naturally be prevented in women during menopause, through the use of 100% natural, convenient and safe bioidentical estrogen replacement therapy, at SottoPelle® in the greater Phoenix, AZ area.

Five more Myths about Testosterone and Women

Five more Myths about Testosterone and Women

We’ve already posted our Top 5 Myths about testosterone use in women, but, believe it or not, there is even more misinformation out there! Let’s dispel a few more untruths about testosterone replacement therapy for women.

Myth #1: Testosterone has adverse effects on the heart. We aren’t sure where this one came from. Perhaps because men have more testosterone than women and men are at greater risk of heart disease than women, someone drew a correlation where none exists. In reality, the exact opposite is true. There is substantial evidence that testosterone is cardiac protective. It has a positive effect on lean body mass, blood sugar metabolism, cardiac muscle, and lipid profiles in both men and women. It is even used to treat and prevent cardiovascular disease. For women with congestive heart failure, testosterone has been shown to improve muscle strength, insulin resistance, and functional capacity. You heard it here: healthy levels of testosterone are good for your heart!

Myth #2: Testosterone causes liver damage. Perhaps this myth arose after concerns of liver and kidney damage in men who took anabolic steroids and oral synthetic androgens. Testosterone patches and implants, unlike pellet hormone replacement therapy, pellets bypass the liver and have no adverse effects on the organ itself, liver enzymes, or clotting factors. We might also add that non-oral testosterone does not increase the risk of pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis the way oral estrogens, androgens and synthetic progestins do.

Myth #3: Testosterone causes aggression. This completely unfounded myth couldn’t be more wrong. Although anabolic steroid use has been shown to increase aggression, this is not the case for testosterone therapy. Even large doses of subcutaneous (under the skin) testosterone therapy do not increase aggression. In fact, studies show that in 90% of women treated for symptoms of androgen deficiency, instances of anxiety, irritability and aggression all decreased with therapy. We’ve known this for a long time: androgen therapy has been used to treat PMS for more than 60 years.

Myth #4: Testosterone may increase the risk of breast cancer. This myth can be a little complicated to sort out because some past studies have noted an association between elevated androgen levels and breast cancer. However, methodological limitations and inconsistencies in these studies call them into question, as well as the fact that they do not account for elevated estradiol levels (excess testosterone can be converted by the body into estradiol, an estrogen associated with breast cancer). Clinical trials have confirmed that a healthy balance of testosterone and estradiol is breast protective. Testosterone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer and may actually lower it in women on estrogen therapy.

Myth #5: The safety of testosterone use in women has not been established. We’ve been accumulating data on testosterone use in women since 1938, when testosterone implants were first used in female patients. Long-term data confirms the safety, efficacy and tolerability of doses of up to 225 mg in women for up to 40 years of therapy. Additionally, data on higher doses of testosterone used in transgender “female to male” patients shows no increase in mortality or major health problems, including breast cancer or vascular disease. Testosterone is safe for women. Seven decades of data proves it.

For more myths about testosterone therapy and women, read our Top 5 Myths on Testosterone Use in Women.

Reference:

Glaser et al. Testosterone therapy in women: Myths and misconceptions. Maturitas (2013) 74:231-234

Top 5 Myths About Testosterone Use In Women

Think testosterone is just for guys? Think again. Testosterone plays a crucial role in women’s health, too, and it’s not what you think. Women across the globe are discovering, with the help of SottoPelle® Therapy, a bioidentical hormone replacement, that testosterone therapy can ease their symptoms of menopause and improve their quality of life in more ways than one.

Let’s take a look at the top 5 myths about testosterone use and women.

  1. Myth #1: Testosterone is a “male” hormone. While we usually associate testosterone with men, the fact is that testosterone is an extremely important part of the hormonal system in both sexes. Testosterone is, in fact, the most abundant biologically active hormone in women! The androgen receptor for testosterone is actually found on the X chromosome. However, testosterone became a member of the “boys only” club, it isn’t based on science.
  2. Myth #2: In women, testosterone only helps with sex drive and libido. Yes, testosterone is the most abundant active sex steroid present in a woman throughout her lifespan, but that’s not where its influence ends. Functional androgen receptors (molecules that bind to testosterone and other androgens to perform specific functions for cells) are located in almost all tissues in the female body, including the breast, heart, blood vessels, gastrointestinal tract, lung, brain, spinal cord, nerves, bladder, uterus, ovaries, endocrine glands, vaginal tissue, skin, bone, muscle and more. This is why testosterone replacement therapy can help women not only with sexual issues, but also with bone loss, muscle loss, urinary complaints, breast pain, rheumatoid complaints, incontinence, and fatigue, just to name a few.
  3. Myth #3: Testosterone masculinizes women. Large doses of testosterone will create a masculinizing effect, as evidenced by hormone treatment for transgender persons. But low dose, individualized testosterone treatments, such as those used with SottoPelle® Therapy, a bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, are designed to bring testosterone levels up to normal, not to exceed them. Any unwanted side effects can be reversed by lowering the dose. Some research has even shown that low doses of testosterone not only don’t masculinize women, they also produce a “feminizing effect.”
  4. Myth #4: Testosterone use will change your voice. Unfortunately, anecdotal reports have suggested that testosterone therapy can cause hoarseness or permanent vocal changes in women; however, studies have produced no conclusive evidence of this. The most common causes of hoarseness and voice change are allergies, laryngitis, reflux, voice over-use, mucosal tears, medications, and vocal cord polyps. Taking testosterone is not going to change your voice.
  5. Myth #5: Testosterone causes hair loss in women. This myth doesn’t make a lot of sense biologically speaking as men have higher levels of testosterone in their bodies than women, and yet they experience more hair loss. The fact is that many factors contribute to hair loss (including genetics), and approximately one third of women experience hair loss and hair thinning with normal aging. As aging coincides with a natural decline in testosterone, this may be where the myth developed. In truth, testosterone pellet therapy has been associated with scalp hair re-growth in many women, suggesting that instead of making women lose hair, raising testosterone back to healthy levels may help them to grow more of it.

Those aren’t all the myths associated with testosterone use in women, but they are some of the most common. Check back for more myths about testosterone therapy and women in our next blog post.

Reference:

Glaser et al. Testosterone therapy in women: Myths and misconceptions. Maturitas (2013) 74:231-234

Making the Most of Menopause?

You shudder in horror at the thought of menopause. The sweaty loveless nights, the jeans that don’t fit, you’re ready to pull out your hair!!

We are brought up to believe that after fifty it’s time to slow down and hunker in for old age- this is a myth!!

Fifty is not what it was years ago, and you don’t have to live with these symptoms at any age!!

It’s time to take the first step to change your life today! Find balance and show the world you are taking on Menopause and winning!!

What advice can we share with you about menopause?

Tips for Menopause:

  1. Find a good friend or support group
  2. Find a understanding and supportive doctor
  3. Find balance in your life – mentally, physically and spiritually

Beauty is ageless and going through menopause is uncomfortable and not fun but it does not change who you are as a person. You can age gracefully and be the best you can be at any age.

Need help or have more questions? Call us today!

I just want you back

It’s 4am, I cant sleep.
I remember sleeping in late, but now I can’t even sleep more than a few hours. It’s funny how you take for granted people, things and even yourself.
I stumble to the bathroom and catch sight of myself in the mirror. At first, I’m startled in my sleep deprived state. I think there is someone else there – that’s not me. People once told me I was pretty now they just call me Mam.

I look in the mirror and wonder when I got old.

I have gained some weight in the last year. My mom just passed this fall after a 6 year battle with colon cancer. It’s unfortunate how old we suddenly feel when a parent passes or maybe it just brings our own mortality front and center. Either way, it’s a sad and scary time.  Then a series of life’s unfortunate events and post menopause and my former size 2 self is now 20 pounds heavier. My daughter scoffs when I complain as she is now struggling to lose 50 pounds herself.

It’s all about perspective, each person’s battle is difficult to them. The worst is not feeling healthy with this extra weight – I don’t feel like me. I have some really pretty clothes and I will  be damned if I have to buy more. Who wants to buy clothes because you can’t squeeze into your current ones ?

That’s not fun.

Midlife is filled with not fun moments for both men and women. Most people are suffering from the challenges of getting older and experiencing changes in body and mind. The key is not to change our spirit. I try to look at everything happening with a sense of humor and as a challenge. But, when you lose sight of yourself it becomes harder.

Starving yourself or crazy fad diets are not the answer. I know because I tried it – no luck.

I spent a lot of money to lose water weight and it’s just not a long term or healthy alternative.

Menopause and Andropause make it harder to do things exactly as we have always done them and reap the same results.  Change can be good if you look at as an opportunity to be a better healthier you. You have to start by getting help.  If your experiencing big changes in weight and health, check in with your doctor.

Gaining weight or feeling bad does not have to be the new you.  I found out that part of my menopause experience was suddenly out of whack hormones and thyroid.  A better diet, regular exercise and medication and I’m beginning to feel better. I’m still getting up earlier but I’m just using that time now for good and not evil. I’m not staring in the mirror at 4am examining wrinkles or grey hairs but taking the dog for a walk or writing.

By the way, taking power naps do work when needed. I’m learning that I’m still me – I’m just evolving.

Who knows, I may become a butterfly!!

What is your midlife experience and how are you dealing with it?

 

Featured Doc: Heather Chauhan, MD, FACOG

SottoPelle is proud to showcase one of our providers in our “Featured Doc Series.”  Heather Chauhan, MD, FACOG practices in Germantown, Tennessee and has been a SottoPelle Trained Provider since January 2014.

Practice Name:
Exceed Hormone Specialists

 

 

Heather Chauhan, M.D. has the following qualifications:

  • Fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians & Gynecologists
  • Diplomate of the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Active Member of:
    • North American Menopause Society
    • Sexual Medicine Society of North America
    • International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health

Please see Heather Chauhan, MD, FACOG’s profile on our directory at: https://www.sottopelletherapy.com/doctors/heather-chauhan-md-facog/ 

Follow her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/exceedhs

Visit her website: https://exceedhs.com/

 

Do you know an amazing SottoPelle doctor? Nominate them here to be a Doctor of the Day!
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Menopause Midwifery or Doulas

I read and research constantly for my blogs on areas of interest.  Occasionally, I come across novel and innovative concepts that inspire me.

Menopause Midwife

When we are going through childbirth we often will choose to have a midwife or Doula.

“Midwives and doulas seem similar, since they’re both people (who aren’t OBs) who help women through labor.  And they are both most commonly chosen by moms-to-be who go drug-free during their delivery. But their roles in the childbirth process are actually quite different.

A midwife is a health care provider, while a doula is more of a childbirth coach. You might choose to have a midwife instead of an OB for prenatal care and to deliver your baby—midwives can deliver babies in hospitals, birthing centers or even in your home. A doula, on the other hand, doesn’t replace your healthcare practitioner but rather can add extra services, such as helping you with techniques to manage pain during labor and even providing support and help during baby’s early days. Isn’t it great there are so many people who can help you though?”(1)

I started thinking why don’t we have these people to support women through the physical, psychological and emotional aspects of menopause?

Imagine, if we had someone who could provide medical informative support combined with personal supportive services as you go through one of the most demanding changes as a woman in your life? There are a many and very good support groups online to help with peer support for menopausal women. But, sometimes you need more. You need that personal attention and support to address your unique concerns and needs during menopause.

Would it help to have someone give you techniques or services to alleviate the symptoms, pain or issues your experiencing  emotionally, mentally and physically?

(1)https://www.thebump.com/a/difference-between-midwife-and-doula